Pickles & Privilege

Whenever I hear the "Women are paid $.78 for the man’s $1" I flip it around.

Men make $1.22 for every woman’s $1.

It interests me that even the most common simple measure of gender inequality is firmly based on male-as-normative …

bisexual activist and queer theory blogger Patrick RichardsFink (via fliponymous)

this is an interesting point, although mathematically inaccurate: assuming the women:men, 0.78:1 ratio is correct, men make $1.28 for every woman’s $1

(via haveyouevercriedwolf)

White people are still the ~standard so that’s not so revolutionary.

(via dykeprivilege)

A white man makes $1.34 for every dollar that a black man makes

A white man makes $1.52 for every dollar that a latino man makes

A white man makes $1.24 for every dollar that a white woman makes

A white man makes $1.44 for every dollar that a black woman makes

A white man makes $1.67 for every dollar that a latina woman makes

That’s some bullshit right there.

(via little-bulldozer)

If you take away anything from this website, please let it be what I bolded ^

(via buxombibliophile)

Let’s take it a step further. For every hour a white man works, a black woman has to work 86 minutes to earn as much money. 57.6 hours a week compared to the white man’s 40.

Take it another step further. Assuming a Monday through Friday, 9 to 5 job, from Thursday 12:45pm through Friday end of business, a white man gets paid for his work, a black woman is, by comparison, working for free.

(via fuckyeahcracker)

See also: Why intersectionality is REALLY FUCKING IMPORTANT OK.

(via geekygothgirl)

(via freshest-tittymilk)

policymic:

Japanese youth are embracing “black culture” but is it blackface?

"Pale skin is a symbol of beauty in Japan," states Metropolis TV reporter Mao. "That is why Japanese girls hate the sun. But nowadays not all girls hate it. They want dark skin, so they look like American hip-hoppers."

So begins a report examining “B-style,” a Japanese youth subculture whose love for all things “black” prompts devotees to braid their hair, rock “urban” fashion and routinely darken their skin at tanning salons.

Read more | Follow policymic

(via fucknofetishization)

yung-pali:

This is the video titled Racism against black people in our Arab society

The video is a report on racism and anti-blackness towards Afro-Palestinians in Kafar Qasem and shares their personal stories and experiences

it is mostly in Arabic and i loved how the Afro-Palestinian women were calling out the bullshit on when lighter Palestinians said that they don’t see race and that we are all arab and muslim 

(via faineemae)

yung-pali:

This is the video titled Racism against black people in our Arab society

The video is a report on racism and anti-blackness towards Afro-Palestinians in Kafar Qasem and shares their personal stories and experiences

it is mostly in Arabic and i loved how the Afro-Palestinian women were calling out the bullshit on when lighter Palestinians said that they don’t see race and that we are all arab and muslim 

(via faineemae)

The 'Fierce Black Woman' Inside You Doesn't Exist

(Source: thisiseverydayracism, via fanufactured)

Saying that we can’t have feminism because we should only focus on general human rights is like saying we can’t have oncologists because some doctors are general practitioners.

It’s like saying that oncologists are bringing so much attention to cancer that no one cares about typhoid or influenza anymore, simply because oncology exists.

It’d make more sense to say that by specializing in the field of oncology, some doctors are more equipped and informed to fight cancer, though they also care about the health of all people and are still highly informed about the state of general medicine.

Likewise, oncologists share their cancer expertise with the entire medical field.

The same could be said for feminists (or womanists, or LGBTQ rights activists, or anti-racists, or reproductive rights activists).

Focusing on the problems facing a specific set of people, especially when these are problems you are passionate about solving, doesn’t mean forgetting that all other problems exist.

It means being so informed and focused in working with a specific population that you can be a resource for the population you serve and for people who are doing more general work.